Recent Comments

The new lego head should be "Robin Bland" of course as he is...

Don't fear, more are on the way. We have four Season 3 comm...

DO MORE BABYLON 5 COMMENTARY'S!!!!!...

Interesting to read these comments from the perspective of 2...

Any moment of fine acting or that will give someone a fright...

Archives:

DWPA Podcast #004: Matthew Waterhouse Waterstone’s Signing – 4th July 2010

Summary:
Welcome to the fourth Doctor Who Podcast Alliance joint podcast.  This episode was recorded at a signing event with Matthew ‘Adric’ Waterhouse at Waterstone’s, Lakeside, Thurrock, to publicise his new memoir Blue Box Boy and his novel Fates, Flowers.

In attendance were various podcasters, including Dave Keep (Professor Dave’s Ark in Space), Tony Gallichan (the Flashing Blade), Martyn Havell (Bad Wilf) and Adam Purcell (Staggering Stories).

  • 00:00 – Theme tune.
  • 01:03 – Podcaster roundtable.
  • 22:00 – Tim Hirst, publisher, interview.
  • 27:27 – Talking with attendees.
  • 33:02 – Matthew Waterhouse interview.
  • 43:06 – Mark Humphries, Organiser, Interview.
  • 45:13 – Matthew Waterhouse ‘Blue Box Boy’ Reading.
  • 51:08 – Derek from Tenth Planet interview
  • 55:15 – Outro and forthcoming events.

One Response to "DWPA Podcast #004: Matthew Waterhouse Waterstone’s Signing – 4th July 2010"

  1. Ross says:

    I’m just old enough to remember the transition from doctor four to doctor five when it originally aired. Blue Box Boy covers the period just before and after that. At that age I was more aware of All Creatures Great and Small and so was pleased when Peter Davison was cast as the Doctor. I had an image of the long coat, scarf and googly eyes of Tom Baker but Davison was really my first doctor.

    The memoir is an amusing look behind the scenes at this period. I had no memory of Adric until I re-watched the episodes recently. The latter part of the book talks about the convention circuit in the early to mid 80s and finally the DVD commentaries more recently which I haven’t listened to yet. The first part is about Waterhouse’s childhood obsession with Doctor Who. I feared that part in particular might be tedious he keeps it interesting. His observations on the cast and crew and associated hangers on and the thoughts that he says he had then but was to shy to say are what make this book a worthwhile read.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.